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singing

Singing helps your child hear the sounds in words and build their vocabulary.


A great big ball...

Rhyme: A Great Big Ball

Related to: Knowing Letters, Sing

A great big ball...

There was a little man...

Rhyme: There Was a Little Man

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

There was a little man...

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands...

Song: If You're Happy and You Know It

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands...

Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo...

Rhyme: Peek-a-boo!

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

Peek-a-boo! Peek-a-boo...

What are these for...

Rhyme: What Are These For?

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

What are these for...

I’m a little teapot, short and stout...

Song: I'm a Little Teapot

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

I’m a little teapot, short and stout...

There's a worm at the bottom of my garden...

Song: There's a Worm at the Bottom of My Garden.

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

There's a worm at the bottom of my garden...

Ring around the rosie...

Song: Ring Around the Rosie

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

Ring around the rosie...

Head and shoulders...

Song: Head and Shoulders

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

Head and shoulders...

Story time, at story time...

Song: Good-Bye

Related to: Hearing Words, Sing

Story time, at story time...

singing Tips

  • Sing songs or rhymes in the language that is most comfortable for you. Young children don't need to understand the words for these moments together to be learning experiences. Songs and music also help your child learn rhythm.
  • Sing throughout the day and make up your own silly songs to introduce new vocabulary. New words can be easier to learn when they rhyme or are put to music. Many activities can be sung to the tune of “Here We Go ‘Round the Mulberry Bush”.
  • When you march, dance or sing together, you break up words into smaller sounds. Add actions as you sing a song or recite a poem. Actions help children break down language into separate words and sounds.

Six skills that get your child ready for reading

  • Liking Books

    Children who enjoy books will want to learn to read.

  • Hearing words

    Hearing the smaller sounds in words helps children sound out written words.

  • Knowing words

    Knowing many words helps children recognize written words and understand what they read.

  • Telling a story

    Learning to tell a story helps children develop skills in thinking and understanding.

  • Seeing words

    Familiarity with printed language helps children feel comfortable with books and reading.

  • Knowing letters

    Knowing the names and sounds of letters helps children sound out words.

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